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Best Practices for Managing Employees Who Order Uniforms Online

Posted by Rick Levine on Mar 22, 2016 9:30:00 AM


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With UniformMarket’s B2B Program Manager, managing employees who order uniforms online has never been easier. Just follow our below best practices and tips to ensure that your online uniform store delivers a seamless and intuitive experience for your employees.

This Is Not The Gap

Regardless of the company, uniforms offer the ability to project a professional image and effectively promote a company brand. Moreover, they provide the wearer with a specific identity, be it a police officer, nurse practitioner, public safety worker, etc.  

An employee can’t just pick out their own shirts and pants from a random selection so as a result, there is no sense in showing them options they can’t wear to work! When it comes to your online uniform store, only provide your staff with the options that are available to them. Keeping the selection within company guidelines allows for a more effective ordering process and reduces the amount of incorrect orders.

Just What The Doctor Orders

It’s advised to setup your website so as soon as an employee logs in, they will see only what the company orders as part of their uniform program. For example, they should be able to see the exact lab coats the doctor loves to order, or the specific shirts that servers at their restaurant need. Additionally, any specific color (or colors) they are allowed to choose from should be explicitly outlined, as well as the sizes that you, as the uniform provider, are keeping in stock for them to order.

Who's Paying for This Anyway?

Upon staff login, there should be no question as to who is actually paying for the uniform items ordered. Will the employee be using their own credit card? If so, will they be reimbursed for the transaction? Or does the company pay for everything?

Oftentimes a company will provide their staff with a certain uniform allowance.  For example, some companies provide their employees with a $500 to $1,000 annual uniform allowance. Your website should keep track of that allowance and let the employee know how much they have left to spend, and how much they’ve already used.

It should also be clear as to what happens when/if an employee needs to buy an extra item. If, for example, the dog ate their uniform and they need to order a shirt to replace the chewed up one, what does the employee do if they’re over their allowance? Can they use their credit card?  Can a supervisor login and credit their account some more money?

Does That Person Even Work Here?

Employees come and go. And with such turnover, it’s important to make sure there is a process established for how new employees will get added to the website, and how past staff will be removed. No one wants to spend money on uniforms that will not be used, or even worse, on uniforms that will need to be returned. So it’s important to either make sure new hires are setup quickly so they can order uniforms, or ensure that a supervisor can login on behalf of the employee and order items in advance of that their start date.

Having staff wear distinctive uniforms can go a long way in establishing an impression in the mind of the consumer. Uniforms help to identify workers as individuals who are associated with a company and its products, and they help to brand the business by distinguishing it from the competition. Consistency in employee appearance can create a positive impression on the customer and contribute to brand loyalty — make sure to have your online uniform store in top shape to ensure ease of ordering for all employees, new and old.

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Topics: Managing A Uniform Program

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